ORIGINAL ARTICLE
LEARNING FROM AN ACADEMIC LECTURE IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: A LESSON FOR THE LECTURER
 
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Państwowa Szkoła Wyższa im. Papieża Jana Pawła II w Białej Podlaskiej
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Halina Chodkiewicz   

Halina Chodkiewicz, Państwowa Szkoła Wyższa im. Papieża Jana Pawła II w Białej Podlaskiej, ul. Sidorska 102, 21-500 Biała Podlaska, e-mail: halinachodkiewicz@wp.pl, tel.: 83 344 99 11
Publication date: 2019-07-20
 
Rozprawy Społeczne/Social Dissertations 2017;11(1):50–56
 
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ABSTRACT
Introduction: The article explores the role of an academic lecture in gaining disciplinary knowledge and developing domain-specific language in a foreign language context. The current study aimed to investigate how students’ knowledge on a selected topic changed after they had participated in a lecture. Material and Methods: in a lecture. Materials and methods. A small-scale qualitative-quantitative study was conducted in a natural context of a lecture delivered to the students of English philology. The students’ statements depicting their knowledge on Communicative Language Teaching provided before and after the lecture were compared in order to examine the information they gained from the lecture content. Results and conclusions: Having listened to the lecture, reviewed their notes and reflected on its contents, the students formulated longer and more precise statements, more frequently commented on the relevant concepts and assumptions, and verbalized them better. The procedure used activated the students’ processing of the content of the lecture and showed the lecturer what kind of information the students focused on.
 
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